More words in print

Hello! Just stopping by to say that due to the kind encouragement of local indie press Analog Submission, you can now preorder a new chapbook of my verse online at: https://www.analogsubmission.com/product/little-irritants-by-darcy-isla

This is a limited run of only 25 copies, and they’re already going, so get in there quickly if you’d like a copy. Some of these ones will most likely be taken off the blog after the chapbook goes out.

Take a peek at the link above for some angry, irritable, punk poems with sand in their pants and stones in their boots.

And here are a couple of variants of the cover:

Words in print

Good morning, happy whatever-day-it-is-when-you-read-this. The rain is pouring down here in York today and the trees are willing Autumn on to deliver their yearly release.

It’s been a while since I created and shared anything new on here. But I’ve been stretching my writing muscles in reviewing on other platforms, and performing in plays and other such nonsense.

This is a quick announcement to day that you can now buy physical, hold-in-your-hand-and-give-to-your-friends collections of my writing on Etsy at https://etsy.me/2LcKcsG

There are currently three items available: Victoriana-inspired love notes, break-up stories, and a collection of 100 poems that I wrote in two days. I’m working on a listing of all three as a package deal too, which will hopefully be up soon.

Even being back here in the post writer in WordPress makes me feel warm and welcome and heard. I missed this.

Please take a look and consider supporting my work, so I can continue to write. Spoons and time are hard to come by. But words are buxom, pressing. The magic of the world needs documenting.

I’m unsure yet, but I think I’d like to maintain this archive of my work online that is accessible for free. My printed books will be for those who have the means to supoort my work, and wish to hold something tangible, smooth, immediately present, to read with their hands and to show and tell with in the good old-fashioned way.

Thank you all, whomever is still here, for your continued commitment and support. You make the transient arts arts possible.

See you soon…

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#61

I haven’t found it yet
But there is a tunnel in our garden
That leads to your flat in Brighton near the Lanes
Near the special sausage shop
Near the retro-vintage warehouse and the piers,
Old and new, and that restaurant
Designed to look like opera boxes
All these things are within my reach.
The cat could even come with me.

List the places you liked to hide as a child

Mostly under the covers, an obvious place
Alongside ridiculously oversized cuddlies
They all had names
One was a long flat dog with long flat ears that lay alongside me on my top bunk
Can’t remember what he was called
We did all sorts under the covers, when we were small
Met friends
Told stories
Mostly to scare each other
Discussed what bodies we had
Enrolled in thousands of careers and areas of expertise
Solved the world’s problems
Conspired on how to ignore our grown-ups’ flaws

The Review That Got Me Fired

I’ve been writing reviews for a few years now, mostly for an online local arts journal, but before that, I covered a few shows for a print publication. I considered myself very lucky and honoured to be a part of the team, and took my contributions very seriously. One day, though, I stopped receiving invites, and the following review was the last I ever submitted. It was never printed, and I never knew why. Indeed, I never even heard from the publication again. I’ve been back and forth over it since then. Is it just not good enough? Did they have a special relationship with the performers I was unaware of and didn’t honour articulately enough? Did the draft I submitted contain hidden Satanic messages? I still don’t know, but having revisited the review again, I’d like to share my appreciation for the show, which I did really enjoy, here.

Music Review: The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain
Grand Opera House, York, Wed 17th June 2015

From American Blues to Russian folk to British pop, the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain have got it covered in their touring anniversary show, 30 Plucking Years.

Formed in 1985 “as a bit of fun”, the charm and energy of this eight-piece ensemble after thirty years of international touring is impressive to say the least, in an industry where most artists perish after around five years. It’s fair to say that the speculation on the Orchestra being a big part of the inspiration behind the current worldwide trend for turning every tune into a tiny, twangy cover is justified. Of course, the instruments may be small but the sound is anything but.

Willingly misleading segues and nonsensical, self-aware banter fill the gaps in a pleasing array of covers across genres including Kiss by Prince, Life On Mars by David Bowie and the inevitable Get Lucky by Daft Punk; all with their own individual twist. Each of the six men and two women take their turn in the spotlight with effortless prowess, hosting tracks suited to their various voices and tastes. The band allow the audience to let their guard down in the second half with some low-key numbers before a punchy, funky finale.

The group are fleeing to Germany – one of their “this song is very popular in…” inspirational travel destinations – for one gig before returning to the UK to continue their tour on the 27th June.

I believe this particular tour is over now, but you can read more about The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain and their upcoming gig dates all over the world here.

Web Series Review: Tales of Bacon

Photograph by Matt Durrant

Photograph by Matt Durrant

Tales of Bacon is an original medieval comedy web series by Plotting Films, written by Natalie Roe and Max Gee, directed and produced by Natalie Roe. The pilot has now been released online, with series one pending funding.

As the story goes…

The year is 1380: Young noblewoman Elfrida Deverwyck (Gemma Shelton) is on an adventure after running away from home and following the pilgrim trails of medieval Northern England. She is accompanied by rascally Pardoner Thaddeus Bacon, (Adam Elms) much to her annoyance, though he may prove to have his uses…

Expect medieval in-jokes, homages to folk tales, songs, historical figures known and obscure. Python meets Blackadder meets Chaucer meets Maid Marion.

Plotting Films have built an authentic world and hit the high notes of production value on a shoe-string budget, thanks to the expert cinematography of Tony Hipwell, Roe’s measured direction and the delightful performances of the leads. Research aided by York academics and museums has paid off, and they’ve made something worth sitting up for. (I’m sure Thaddeus and Elfrida would agree that standing would be beyond the call of duty, as you can enjoy this series from the comfort of your chambers, or your outhouse, if you’re so inclined.)

This series is charming and feisty from the off, with wonderful performances all-round, big fat tongues in cheeks, and an informed, thoughtful script and production team that will delight feminists everywhere. The setting may be old, but the perspective is refreshingly new. Postpone your premium blockbuster plans and enjoy this satisfying new story for free in your own home.

You can watch the pilot episode online now, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBPsQjflhGs

And when you can’t wait for more, you can fund the completion of the series here: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/tales-of-bacon-a-medieval-comedy-fundraiser?fse_1=c

Photograph by Matt Durrant, Poster by Laura Gale

Photograph by Matt Durrant, Poster by Laura Gale